Digital Journalism Job Summit!

At Thursday’s Digital Journalism Job Summit, we’ll visit with three recent SMU and Digital Journalism alums who all are thriving as Web-empowered media professionals:

Come with questions! BONUS: Marissa wrote a blog post for an earlier Digital class with all kinds of helpful job-hunting tips:

Hi Jake!

I’d like to think I learned a thing or two over my job search process so here goes! I apologize in advance for any typos..

1) ENJOY YOURSELF: Enjoy your last few weeks at SMU, they really are some of the best weeks of your entire college career. Graduation, especially the Meadows graduation is such an amazing time spent with your family AND friends!

2) Don’t think you need a job by May 15. You don’t. You’ve worked really hard the past four years and the right job is out there. I remember thinking I should apply to PR jobs just to have “a job” by May 15 like my older siblings had. That couldn’t be more false! In reality, this could be your last summer without a 9-5 job, so enjoy yourself!

3) …that being said, DON’T CREATE A GAP IN YOUR RESUME. The beauty of journalism is you can build your resume anytime any where. Could an accountant build their resume while laying on the beach all summer? No. Journalists can! I spent my summer after college writing for WhatsUpTucket, a social media hub for the island of Nantucket off of Cape Cod. (www.whatsuptucket.com) I wrote every week, if not every day. I had so much fun interviewing people and writing stories covering what was happening on the island. No matter what you’re doing this summer, blog about it! Tweet about it. Talk about it! Even if it’s “20 things I learned in summer 2012”- use your digital journalism skills and turn it into a piece you can bring in to interviews! When I interviewed at E! for my current job in New Media, they wanted to hear more about my summer writing for WhatUpTucket than my summer spent interning at The View in NYC. I specifically talked about how the site truly branded itself and wrote for a unique audience. This is something all of you have probably already done on your website!

4) NETWORK! It really is the name of the game. While on Nantucket for the summer I met so many different people who knew so many different people who worked in the entertainment field. SO many people you don’t even know yet want to help you find a job! (Myself included!) Tell people upfront that you just graduated from SMU with a degree in journalism, tell them about the daily update, your personal website etc! People will listen and they will help you – so don’t be shy and definitely don’t be embarrassed to say you don’t have a job yet! Trust me, you’re in good company!

5) The Job Search: Be patient, but be persistent! Make a list of job sites that you’re interested in and check them a few times a week. http://www.nbcunicareers.com where I found my job, updates their website EVERY day! I would research jobs every Monday and Wednesday of the week last summer and I typically waited to apply to jobs on a Monday or Tuesday. I’m not sure if there’s any truth behind this, but I didn’t think people would be interested in my emails on a Thursday or Friday when they were thinking about the weekend! Also, create a list of companies you’d like to work for and follow them on twitter! Starting today. If you’re intereted in ESPN, follow @RecruiterStacy – she tweets jobs all the time! So does @DisneyABC, foxcareers, etc. I was given the advice to apply for jobs that had “coordinator or assistant” in the title. Don’t be dismayed at careers that require 2-3 years of experience- majority will! Mine did! You have been immersing yourself in many different news platforms the past four years of college — and your hard work should be credited! Talk about your digital journalism work; your knowledge of vimeo, wordpress, garageband etc! Recruiters LOVE to hear from young people who have a good grasp on the futue of the industry, and all of you do!

6) You found the perfect job – but how do you let them know you’d be perfect for it? Many times when I was applying for jobs online I was convinced my resume and cover letters were getting lost in cyberspace. There really is know way to be sure that a job you submit online gets read by the proper person. Try to find someone in HR at the company- many times even just googling the company and HR you can locate a recruiter. Also, don’t be shy about asking around! If your cousins friend brother works at Good Morning America and that’s your dream – send him a facebook message simply asking if he knows the contact information for HR. You’re not asking for a job, you’re simply asking for an email address and everyone who has a job today was in your position at one point. If you can, drop in to the place you’re applying and submit your resume in person. This sounds so old fashion, but I know many people who landed job this way! It show that your eager and enthusiastic.

7) Interviewing: I truly believe that landing an interview is harder than nailing an interview. Once you have an interview lined up prepare yourself – update your website, tweak your resume, and show up to the interview with writing samples. Be enthusiastic! If nothing else, leave the interview knowing that you were the most enthusiastic person they met that day. Many recruiters are just looking for personalities that are teachable — you can learn any skill set with the right personality and eagerness to learn. Show up prepared with questions – one question I asked was “What is the most common mistake new hires make?” – and people always love that question! People also love to talk about themselves- ask them how they got their start in the industry, where they went to college etc. Highlight your work at SMU and in internships. Be prepared to talk about things you learned along the way. I always say that my summer at The View one of the main things I learned was managing personalities. On and off the screen, ‘The View’ is made up of a cast of characters- there were so many unique personalities and learning how to work with each one of them was the hardest part of the job! It’s “real world” experience like that which shows people that at 21/22 you’re prepared for the industry.

If you need any help brainstorming or talking about ways to highlight your skill set have a mock interview with Jake or Lucy! I am also more than willing to help you. If any of you have any questions, feel free to email me!

Good luck y’all — and congrats on graduating!

Remember: there’s no better time to be a journalist! Really!

All the best,

Marissa

Madeleine Kalb Photo Slideshow

Energy Transfer Partners, A Dallas based oil & gas company, has evoked widespread opposition and fear amongst residents of the Big Bend Region of West Texas with their plans and imminent construction of an underground pipeline. Local residents believe that the 143 mile long, 42-inch pipe will destroy the region’s pristine and ancient natural habitat that is still to this day home to indigenous people. Elected Walelu township Chief Bill Hoff who resides in Valentine, TX is a descendent of the Tsalagiyi Nvdagi Tribe of Cherokee Nation who is strongly opposed to the pipeline and the damage he believes it will create for the next seven generations of his people.

Take-home audio gathering exercise

*** SEE FULL ASSIGNMENT ON BLACKBOARD (under Assignments) – YOUR SOUNDCLOUD LINKS ARE DUE BY 11:59 P.M. WEDNESDAY, 3/16 ***

The ultimate goal of our two-part audio gathering/editing lab exercise is to produce a short audio clip of 30 to 45 seconds that tells a coherent story. Here’s an example from Digital Journalism alum Laura Rowe, who visited an SMU isotope lab:

And just to show y’all that even old fogies can do this, here are two more example audio labs completed by two of your favorite professors:

Batsell — The Fountain on a Late Winter Day


Suhler — E-mailing: The Scourge of the 21st Century

Two more examples (to be explained further in class):

From these examples, you can see that you will need 1) NAT SOUND; 2) VO and 3) a short INTERVIEW describing the sound (preferably with someone you don’t know).

Save your three (SHORT) raw audio files on your computer or an external drive and post them individually to SoundCloud. Email them to me by 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, March 16. On Thursday, bring your raw files to class. You’ll use GarageBand to edit your three clips into an NPR-worthy masterpiece!

P.S. Looking for some tips on voiceovers? Here’s a great tutorial from the Knight Digital Media Center.

The Power of Multimedia Storytelling

Image

For class on Tuesday, March 1, read the “Drilling Down” boxes in the Briggs book on pages 164-5 and 178. Then watch this four-minute audio slideshow by The Washington Post, “No Greater Love.”

In a previous edition of Journalism Next, NBC News Vice President Stokes Young says the promise of multimedia storytelling is to provide what he calls an “immersive experience: bringing the story to viewers through multiple senses and, hopefully, bringing viewers into stories — the experiences of other folks — in ways that increase understanding.”

By 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 29, leave a comment on this post (worth 5 class participation points) answering one of these questions:

  • Did “No Greater Love” deliver an “immersive experience” and, if so, how?
  • Would this story have been more or less powerful if told through video rather than through sound and still images?
  • Would this story have been more or less powerful if it used voiceover from the journalist, rather than relying entirely on sources for narration?

Personal Branding and the Job Hunt

On Tuesday, we’ll start talking about jobs, personal branding and how to land that first gig. Read this revealing Poynter post, “We just read 160 résumés. Here are 10 things you should not do,” as well as the Global Press Journal’s “Open letter to journalism students who want jobs.” Check out this Dallas Morning News graphic about the social résumé. And if this class has intrigued you about job opportunities related to audience engagement, read this Digiday piece about the evolving job duties of social media editors and/or this recent Columbia Journalism Review piece — you may recognize one of the sources. 🙂

Your homework (5 points) is to comment (not tweet — this time, at least) on this post, answering/reacting to one of the following questions by 11:59 p.m. Monday:

  • What was the most memorable advice you took away from any of these readings?
  • Browse through some of Batsell’s favorite journalism job listings below. What trends/patterns do you see in what employers are looking for?

JOB/INTERNSHIP LISTINGS:
JournalismJobs.com
Poynter.org’s searchable job database
Mashable jobs
MediaBistro jobs
DFW Communicators Job Bank
Negotiating tips

Live blogging: A staple of 21st-century journalism

As the readings make clear, live blogging is an important journalistic tool that can deliver context to readers as they are processing the news in real time. Live blogging often is absorbed a “second-screen” experience during which people simultaneously view live events such as political debates, sports events and even entertainment awards shows.

During today’s live blog exercise, you will bring context to Saturday’s GOP presidential debate in South Carolina by carefully searching for — and evaluating the credibility of — news reports and other resources that provide your readers with critical background and perspective. We will use CoverItLive, which is used by many journalism organizations to provide running coverage of live events. In the past, SMU J-students have even used CoverItLive to live blog about the SMU Student Senate, college lacrosse and SMU’s Celebration of Lights.

We will live blog the speech for about 25 minutes. For your live-blog entries, you can paraphrase the candidates’ comments, use direct quotes, provide links or share your own journalistic observations. (Whether you personally agree with the candidates doesn’t matter … you are simply trying to bring context to your readers who are following the speech.)

When the speech goes live, it’s going to seem a little chaotic. That’s OK. There are no points at stake here. It’s a practice exercise.

News as conversation

My book, Engaged Journalism: Connecting With Digitally Empowered News Audiences (Columbia University Press, February 2015) examines the changing relationship between journalists and the audiences they serve. I’m eager to hear your reactions. For Tuesday’s class, please read Chapter 2: News As Conversation (the PDF is on Blackboard under “assignments”). By noon on Monday, Feb. 8, post a reaction of 100 to 200 words as a comment on this post addressing the following question: How (if at all) did the chapter change the way you think about the role the audience plays in the journalistic process? In your response, cite specific examples from your own reading of the chapter, as well as your own observations and experience. It’s not acceptable to piggy-back on your classmates’ answers without reading the chapter yourself. This assignment is worth 10 class participation points.

Digital Journalism Job Summit!

At Tuesday’s Digital Journalism Job Summit, we’ll visit with three recent SMU and Digital Journalism alums who all are thriving as Web-empowered media professionals:

    • Aida Ahmed, formerly a crime and government reporter for the Las Vegas Sun, is a social media specialist for Deloitte in Dallas.
    • Kelsey Charles works for the Dallas Cowboys. She is the managing editor for 5PointsBlue.com and formerly co-hosted Talkin’ Cowboys, a radio show.
    • Marissa O’Connor, formerly a programming coordinator for new media at E! Online in Los Angeles, is social media manager for the Arizona Coyotes in Phoenix.

Come with questions! BONUS: Marissa wrote a blog post for an earlier Digital class with all kinds of helpful job-hunting tips:

Hi Jake!

I’d like to think I learned a thing or two over my job search process so here goes! I apologize in advance for any typos..

1) ENJOY YOURSELF: Enjoy your last few weeks at SMU, they really are some of the best weeks of your entire college career. Graduation, especially the Meadows graduation is such an amazing time spent with your family AND friends!

2) Don’t think you need a job by May 15. You don’t. You’ve worked really hard the past four years and the right job is out there. I remember thinking I should apply to PR jobs just to have “a job” by May 15 like my older siblings had. That couldn’t be more false! In reality, this could be your last summer without a 9-5 job, so enjoy yourself!

3) …that being said, DON’T CREATE A GAP IN YOUR RESUME. The beauty of journalism is you can build your resume anytime any where. Could an accountant build their resume while laying on the beach all summer? No. Journalists can! I spent my summer after college writing for WhatsUpTucket, a social media hub for the island of Nantucket off of Cape Cod. (www.whatsuptucket.com) I wrote every week, if not every day. I had so much fun interviewing people and writing stories covering what was happening on the island. No matter what you’re doing this summer, blog about it! Tweet about it. Talk about it! Even if it’s “20 things I learned in summer 2012”- use your digital journalism skills and turn it into a piece you can bring in to interviews! When I interviewed at E! for my current job in New Media, they wanted to hear more about my summer writing for WhatUpTucket than my summer spent interning at The View in NYC. I specifically talked about how the site truly branded itself and wrote for a unique audience. This is something all of you have probably already done on your website!

4) NETWORK! It really is the name of the game. While on Nantucket for the summer I met so many different people who knew so many different people who worked in the entertainment field. SO many people you don’t even know yet want to help you find a job! (Myself included!) Tell people upfront that you just graduated from SMU with a degree in journalism, tell them about the daily update, your personal website etc! People will listen and they will help you – so don’t be shy and definitely don’t be embarrassed to say you don’t have a job yet! Trust me, you’re in good company!

5) The Job Search: Be patient, but be persistent! Make a list of job sites that you’re interested in and check them a few times a week. http://www.nbcunicareers.com where I found my job, updates their website EVERY day! I would research jobs every Monday and Wednesday of the week last summer and I typically waited to apply to jobs on a Monday or Tuesday. I’m not sure if there’s any truth behind this, but I didn’t think people would be interested in my emails on a Thursday or Friday when they were thinking about the weekend! Also, create a list of companies you’d like to work for and follow them on twitter! Starting today. If you’re intereted in ESPN, follow @RecruiterStacy – she tweets jobs all the time! So does @DisneyABC, foxcareers, etc. I was given the advice to apply for jobs that had “coordinator or assistant” in the title. Don’t be dismayed at careers that require 2-3 years of experience- majority will! Mine did! You have been immersing yourself in many different news platforms the past four years of college — and your hard work should be credited! Talk about your digital journalism work; your knowledge of vimeo, wordpress, garageband etc! Recruiters LOVE to hear from young people who have a good grasp on the futue of the industry, and all of you do!

6) You found the perfect job – but how do you let them know you’d be perfect for it? Many times when I was applying for jobs online I was convinced my resume and cover letters were getting lost in cyberspace. There really is know way to be sure that a job you submit online gets read by the proper person. Try to find someone in HR at the company- many times even just googling the company and HR you can locate a recruiter. Also, don’t be shy about asking around! If your cousins friend brother works at Good Morning America and that’s your dream – send him a facebook message simply asking if he knows the contact information for HR. You’re not asking for a job, you’re simply asking for an email address and everyone who has a job today was in your position at one point. If you can, drop in to the place you’re applying and submit your resume in person. This sounds so old fashion, but I know many people who landed job this way! It show that your eager and enthusiastic.

7) Interviewing: I truly believe that landing an interview is harder than nailing an interview. Once you have an interview lined up prepare yourself – update your website, tweak your resume, and show up to the interview with writing samples. Be enthusiastic! If nothing else, leave the interview knowing that you were the most enthusiastic person they met that day. Many recruiters are just looking for personalities that are teachable — you can learn any skill set with the right personality and eagerness to learn. Show up prepared with questions – one question I asked was “What is the most common mistake new hires make?” – and people always love that question! People also love to talk about themselves- ask them how they got their start in the industry, where they went to college etc. Highlight your work at SMU and in internships. Be prepared to talk about things you learned along the way. I always say that my summer at The View one of the main things I learned was managing personalities. On and off the screen, ‘The View’ is made up of a cast of characters- there were so many unique personalities and learning how to work with each one of them was the hardest part of the job! It’s “real world” experience like that which shows people that at 21/22 you’re prepared for the industry.

If you need any help brainstorming or talking about ways to highlight your skill set have a mock interview with Jake or Lucy! I am also more than willing to help you. If any of you have any questions, feel free to email me!

Good luck y’all — and congrats on graduating!

Remember: there’s no better time to be a journalist! Really!

All the best,

Marissa

Take-home audio gathering exercise

***SEE FULL ASSIGNMENT ON BLACKBOARD (under Assignments) – YOUR SOUNDCLOUD LINKS ARE DUE BY NOON MONDAY, 10/26***

The ultimate goal of our two-part audio gathering/editing lab exercise is to produce a short audio clip of 30 to 45 seconds that tells a coherent story. Here’s an example from Digital Journalism alum Laura Rowe, who visited an SMU isotope lab:

And just to show y’all that even old fogies can do this, here are two more example audio labs completed by two of your favorite professors:

Batsell — The Fountain on a Late Winter Day


Suhler — E-mailing: The Scourge of the 21st Century

Two more examples (to be explained further in class):

From these examples, you can see that you will need 1) NAT SOUND; 2) VO and 3) a short INTERVIEW describing the sound (preferably with someone you don’t know).

Save your three (SHORT) raw audio files on your computer or an external drive and post them individually to SoundCloud. Email them to me by noon Monday, Oct. 26. On Tuesday, bring your raw files to class. You’ll use GarageBand to edit your three clips into an NPR-worthy masterpiece!

P.S. Looking for some tips on voiceovers? Here’s a great tutorial from the Knight Digital Media Center.

The Power of Multimedia Storytelling

Image

For class on Thursday, Oct. 15, read the “Drilling Down” boxes in the Briggs book on pages 164-5 and 178. Then watch this four-minute audio slideshow by The Washington Post, “No Greater Love.”

In a previous edition of Journalism Next, NBC News Vice President Stokes Young says the promise of multimedia storytelling is to provide what he calls an “immersive experience: bringing the story to viewers through multiple senses and, hopefully, bringing viewers into stories — the experiences of other folks — in ways that increase understanding.”

By 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 14, leave a comment on this post (worth 5 class participation points) answering one of these questions:

  • Did “No Greater Love” deliver an “immersive experience” and, if so, how?
  • Would this story have been more or less powerful if told through video rather than through sound and still images?
  • Would this story have been more or less powerful if it used voiceover from the journalist, rather than relying entirely on sources for narration?

Playlist Team: The Beats

By Christen Limbaugh (@x10limbaugh) , Lauren Castle (@lauren_castle) and Matt Sanders (@mattasanders).

1. The Texas Rangers went from worst to first in 2015, and now they are headed to the playoffs as division champions.

2. A deadly crash killed two adults, two children and an unborn child yesterday.

3. Customers asked, and McDonald’s listened. Starting today, all day breakfast will be available to people nationwide.

4. Up next on the playlist is the Beatles’ hit, “Tax Man” which many Texans can relate to right now. Texans will pass an amendment that will lower their property taxes. Property Tax Relief Comes With Big Cost to State.

5. Laura Glading, the President of the American Airlines’ flight attendant union announced that she will resign on December 2. After controversy that included collusion and nepotism, Glading said she will not run for a third term.

6. The anxiously anticipated storm cell  Hurricane Joaquin continues to devastate cities on the East Coast. Like Gnarles Barkley’s song, “Storm Coming” the damage from Joaquin keeps crashing on.

7. Adam Levine chose this lucky Tyler teen, Chance Peña, as his protege. The other judges didn’t believe in him at first, but he probably remembered  Journey’s song “Don’t Stop Believin'” while he climbed to the top.

8. The State Fair of Texas is up and running. It’s time to eat all the fried food possible.

9. Drivers in the DFW area probably think of Rihanna’s angst-filled ballad, “Shut Up and Drive” as they drive on the 10 Most Road-Rage Inducing Highways in DFW.

10. Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas was shut down this morning for the filming of “11/22/63,” starring James Franco. The Hulu mini-series highlights the assassination of John F Kennedy.

Playlist Team: DJ BATSELL

 

1. Ted Cruz says accepting Muslim Syrian refugees is “crazy.” Among those refugees could be a number of ISIS terrorists. It is not confirmed that there are in fact ISIS members among the refugees but it is possible that they will try to infiltrate it.

2. From 2013-2015, 97 earthquakes have hit North Texas. Scientists expect to have a network of seismographs up and running sometime next year to help determine what’s happening under the surface in the North Texas area, according to an article in the Star-Telegram.

3. Amtrak tweets on October 5th that no life-threatening injuries have been reported following the derailment of Train 55 in Vermont. A Times Argus photographer said the train’s locomotive had tumbled over an embankment along with two passenger cars and was damaged and resting against some trees. A third passenger car was sitting diagonally across the track, according to WFAA article.

4. A project called CityMAP has gathered planners for a vision of a future for downtown Dallas. The aging highways need a makeover to continue to connect public urban spaces and spur new neighborhood developments, developments and job center.

5. The NCAA has hit Southern Methodist University men’s basketball team with severe sanctions for misconduct. Head Coach Larry Brown has been suspended for 30 percent of this season’s games and the team has been disqualified for post-season play. Sanctions have also been placed on SMU men’s golf team. Read more at SMU’s Daily Campus.

6. Forget about that summer bod – The State Fair of Texas will have you “All About That Bass.”

7. With energy demand only predicted to rise each year, the search is ongoing for more places to power up. North Texas generates nearly 80 units across the state and nearly 40 more will be a part of the system next year.

8. More than a dozen dams have burst across the state of South Carolina. Some of the breaches forced officials to evacuate neighborhoods. A solid week of rainfall has sent nearly 1,000 people to shelters, and left about 40,000 without drinkable water. Listen to “Hero” by Enrique Iglesias.

9. “Baby theres a Shark in the Water”… but luckily a 13-year-old West Texas boy was saved from a shark attack by his brother at Galveston Beach. This tragic incident only resulted in an injured foot requiring stitches.

10. An update on Texas High school football scores across North Texas. Listen to “Boys of Fall” by Kenny Chesney to grasp the emotions that these players feel when playing under the lights.

11. Texas wine month has begun. Wine connoisseurs get to enjoy Texas-grown grapes and wines made specifically in Texas. Did you know at least 75 percent of Texas wine is produced from grapes grown in Texas and less than 25 percent of American wine is made with Texas grapes?

12. The flu vaccine is now available in Texas. Medical authorities say everyone from the age of 6 months old should be vaccinated this year. The strain of last year’s flu virus will be included in this year’s strain which will make this season’s shot much more effective.

Playlist Team: The Media Friend-zies

By: Alison Glander (@a_glander), Cameron Luttrell (@camluttrell), Sue Han (@suefullyhan)

  1. Ahmed Mohamad made national news for bringing a clock to school, never received the Irving ISD letter because school district sent it to the wrong lawyer.
  2. Ted Cruz faces hurdles with Senate as the black sheep among Republicans.
  3. 13-year-old West Texas boy has been hospitalized after a shark bit him on the back of his foot after wading in the Galveston Island Beach.
  4. State Fair rolls out the 10 of the best and worst foods at the State Fair.
  5. McKinney Fire Department will deliver Domino’s pizzas to random orders for Fire Prevention Week.
  6. An additional federal gun charge comes out for Love who has been jailed for killing a Dentist in an uptown garage.
  7. Europe rules down on Facebook and other tech companies that prohibits them from transferring users’ data in servers in the U.S.
  8. Michigan fiberglass supervisor is still in unbelief about winning the $310.5 million Powerball jackpot.
  9. Rangers, once the underdog, are now the making a comeback from all their defeats.
  10. Truck hauling honeybees overturned on a Oklahoma highway setting swarms of insects loose along the highway.

Playlist Team: The Editors

By Christina Cox (@_ChristinaCox_), CarleeAnn Allen (@CarleeAnnAllen) and Emily Ward (@emilytward).

  1. A shark bit a 13-year-old West Texas boy in the back of the foot when he was wading in the water at Galveston Beach. His foot was bandaged before he was transported to University of Texas Medical Branch.
  2. General Mills announced a recall of 1.8 million boxes of regular Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios that could put people with celiac disease and wheat allergies at risk.
  3. The Supreme Court’s new term began Monday. Media outlets predict the Supreme Court will focus on cases about abortion, immigration and higher education.
  4. The University of Texas System Board of Regents approved an increase in tuition and fees for the 2017 and 2018 fiscal years. This is the first significant jump in tuition since Fall 2012.
  5. Takaaki Kajita and Arthur McDonald won the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics “for the discovery of neutrino oscillations which shows the neutrinos have mass.”
  6. The Dallas Cowboys’ committee is questioning the role of running back Joseph Randle after Sunday’s loss to the New Orleans Saints.
  7. The Texas Rangers won the American League West title with a 9-2 victor over the Los Angeles Angles.
  8. Texas Rangers fans can chow down on Texas-sized concessions like 24-inch fried brownies, 1-poud bags of Cheetos and cotton candy hot dogs in the postseason.
  9. Hurricane Joaquin has intensified to a Category 4 storm and continues to hammer the central Bahamas, but a U.S. landfall now appears less likely.
  10. A major scandal erupted in the fantasy sports industry after employees at DraftKings and FanDuel admitted to insider trading.
  11. Scientists hope to learn how Pompeians lived before Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D. with a computerized tomography scanner, or CT scanner.

Crafting newsy Spotify playlists on #NewsEngagementDay

Happy National News Engagement Day!

Today in class, we will be breaking up into groups of three to curate 10 recent news stories and pair them with relevant, appropriate songs available on Spotify. Check out the Twitter hashtag #NewsEngagementDay and you’ll see what some of your fellow journalism students around the country are doing to participate. Last year, we made the national Top 10 list!

Here is your group’s mission for the next 70 minutes:

  • Come up with a fun, newsy name for your group! (Examples: The Deadlines; Off The Record)
  • THIS IS IMPORTANT: Take a look at #j4398 playlists (List #1 | List #2) from last year’s #NewsEngagementDay to get a sense of how your predecessors have combined news and music. Watch out for pairings that could be offensive. Also peruse our master playlist that ran on The Texas Tribune last semester. Previously used songs are off limits!
  • Plug in your headphones and earbuds and start browsing local and state news sources including The Dallas Morning NewsThe Texas TribuneKERA.org, the Fort Worth Star-TelegramWFAANBC 5CBS 11, and, of course, The Daily Campus.  Search on Spotify for songs that somehow relate to these stories.
  • Be creative! Have fun! Feel free to include songs that your parents and professors have never heard of! But it’s also OK (encouraged, even!) to include music from different decades and genres.
  • Get together as a group. Settle on 10 songs for your playlist.
  • Divvy up the duties to write a couple of sentences explaining the news connection to each song.
  • Appoint a Spotify-savvy curator to compile your playlist and a WordPress-savvy scribe to embed the playlist and write/publish your post.
  • By the end of class, each group must publish to the course blog a post containing: 1) The name of your group in the headline; 2) An embedded Spotify playlist of at least 10 songs, like the examples above; 3) A brief explanation of why you picked each song, along with a link to the story it was inspired by; 4) The name of each person in your group, with links to your Twitter handles.
  • Last step! Each group member should tweet the link to your published blog post/playlist, along with the hashtags #NewsEngagementDay and #j4398. Explain it to your followers with some context — this can be your act of engagement for this week’s Power Tweets.
  • Oh, yeah: Bring your A-game! Your peers from Saint Louis University’s CMM 4100: Multiplatform Journalism course will rank your playlists and crown the winning #j4398 group. PRIZES are at stake!!

Remember these helpful tips on compiling a newsy playlist, created just for you by the Texas Tribune’s Reeve Hamilton:

  • The connection to the story should be clear from the title of the song.
  • If you can’t follow the first rule, you can explain why the lyrics work. But as they say in politics, when you are explaining, you are losing.
  • With exceptions, the lyrics of the song should seem applicable to the news situation if you use your imagination and squint a little. If this is just impossible, that’s ok. But before you settle, see what other options are out there.
  • The playlist should be listenable (obviously this is subjective). But if you are going to take the time to make something like this, make something people can actually get enjoyment out of.
  • Don’t take it too seriously (but do put some effort into it).

National News Engagement Day

ned2015-nolines

During class on Tuesday, Oct. 6, we will participate in National News Engagement Day, sponsored by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Check out the Twitter hashtag #NewsEngagementDay and you’ll see what some of your fellow journalism students around the country are doing to participate. Last year, we made the national Top 10 list!

Full details will be shared in class — there will be PRIZES!! — but here is how you can prepare:

  • Read this AP article about how Americans of all ages still crave meaty news, not just kitten videos.
  • Our mission for Tuesday: You’ll work in three-person teams to create Spotify playlists inspired by timely local news stories from the DFW region. Last year, #j4398 students collaborated with The Texas Tribune to match political news stories with songs inspired by the news. (See, news can be fun!)
  • Peruse our master playlist from last semester to get a sense of how to combine news and music. Watch out for pairings that could be offensive.
  • Between Saturday and Tuesday, browse local news sources including The Dallas Morning News, KERA.org, the Fort Worth Star-TelegramWFAA, NBC 5, CBS 11, and, of course, The Daily Campus. Come to class with at least three songs in mind that somehow relate to recent local news, sports, politics, business, arts stories that have been published within the last week. Be creative! And make sure the songs are available on Spotify.
  • Bring headphones and download Spotify on your laptop if you don’t have it already installed.
  • Oh, yeah: Bring your A-game! Your peers from Saint Louis University’s CMM 4100: Multiplatform Journalism course will be ranking your playlists and crowning the winning #j4398 group. PRIZES are at stake!!

Remember these helpful tips on compiling a newsy playlist, created just for you by former Texas Tribune reporter Reeve Hamilton:

  • The connection to the story should be clear from the title of the song.
  • If you can’t follow the first rule, you can explain why the lyrics work. But as they say in politics, when you are explaining, you are losing.
  • With exceptions, the lyrics of the song should seem applicable to the news situation if you use your imagination and squint a little. If this is just impossible, that’s ok. But before you settle, see what other options are out there.
  • The playlist should be listenable (obviously this is subjective). But if you are going to take the time to make something like this, make something people can actually get enjoyment out of.
  • Don’t take it too seriously (but do put effort into it).

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Personal Branding and the Job Hunt

On Tuesday, we’ll start talking about jobs, personal branding and how to land that first gig. Read this Poynter CoverItLive chat, “What skills are digital-first newsrooms looking for?“, as well as this Dallas Morning News graphic about the social résumé and this Digiday piece about the evolving job duties of social media editors. Also, read the executive summary of the 2013 Annual Survey of Journalism & Mass Communication Graduates, and browse through some of the findings about salaries, desired qualities, etc. And — this one is optional — if you’re further intrigued about job opportunities related to audience engagement, read this Columbia Journalism Review piece from earlier this month. You may recognize one of the sources. 🙂

Your homework (5 points) is to comment (not tweet — this time, at least) on this post, answering/reacting to one of the following questions by 11:59 p.m. Monday:

  • What was the most memorable advice you took away from either: 1) John Hiner’s comments in the Poynter chat; 2) the DMN graphic about “The Social Media Résumé; or 3) the Digiday piece about social media editors?
  • What surprised you most about the 2013 survey findings — and how did the survey change/confirm your personal outlook toward the journalism job market?
  • Browse through some of Batsell’s favorite journalism job listings below. What trends/patterns do you see in what employers are looking for?

JOB/INTERNSHIP LISTINGS:
JournalismJobs.com
Poynter.org’s searchable job database
Mashable jobs
Lost Remote (TV-related digital journalism jobs)
DFW Communicators Job Bank
Negotiating tips

Live blogging: A Staple of 21st-Century Journalism

As the readings make clear, live blogging is an important journalistic tool that can deliver context to readers as they are processing the news in real time. Live blogging often is absorbed a “second-screen” experience during which people simultaneously view live events such as political debates, sports events and even entertainment awards shows.

During today’s live blog exercise, you will bring context to last week’s debate GOP presidential debate by carefully searching for — and evaluating the credibility of — news reports and other resources that provide your readers with critical background and perspective. We will use CoverItLive, which is used by many journalism organizations to provide running coverage of live events. In the past, SMU J-students have even used CoverItLive to live blog about the SMU Student Senate, college lacrosse and SMU’s Celebration of Lights.

We will live blog the speech for about 25 minutes. For your live-blog entries, you can paraphrase the candidates’ comments, use direct quotes, provide links or share your own journalistic observations. (Whether you personally agree with the candidates doesn’t matter … you are simply trying to bring context to your readers who are following the speech.)

When the speech goes live, it’s going to seem a little chaotic. That’s OK. There are no points at stake here. It’s a practice exercise.

News as conversation

My book, Engaged Journalism: Connecting With Digitally Empowered News Audiences (Columbia University Press, February 2015) examines the changing relationship between journalists and the audiences they serve. I’m eager to hear your reactions. For Tuesday’s class, please read Chapter 2: News As Conversation (the PDF is on Blackboard under “assignments”). By noon on Monday, Sept. 14, post a reaction of 100 to 200 words as a comment on this post addressing the following question: How (if at all) did the chapter change the way you think about the role the audience plays in the journalistic process? In your response, cite specific examples from your own reading of the chapter, as well as your own observations and experience. It’s not acceptable to piggy-back on your classmates’ answers without reading the chapter yourself. This assignment is worth 10 class participation points.

Visualize your Twitter presence

Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 10.46.48 PM

In an increasingly digital (and competitive) job market, does your Twitter presence accurately reflect your professional and personal interests? Here’s a quick first step to find out:*

* If you have tweeted fewer than 10 times, this exercise won’t be of much help right now. Instead, use the time to follow more smart people on Twitter and create Twitter lists that reflect your studies and interests.

  • Using Safari or Firefox on a laptop or desktop, log on to your Twitter account.
  • Go to your Twitter profile SETTINGS.
  • Scroll to the bottom. Click the button to request your Twitter archive.
  • Check your email and download the archive. In your Downloads folder, you’ll see something like the screen shot below. Click the tweets.csv file, and an Excel spreadsheet will pop up.Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 10.37.50 PM
  • Select all of the content in the TEXT field of the tweets.csv spreadsheet. Copy it. (Cmd-C)
  • Go to Wordle.net (again, MUST be in Safari or Firefox).
  • Click “create your own” and paste all text in the box. Click “Go.”
  • You may need to download/run a Java program for the program to work. That’s OK:Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 10.44.12 PM
  • Once your word cloud has loaded, feel free to click the “randomize” button for a prettier design.
  • When you’ve found the design you like, click the “Save as .png” button and save the file as “yournamewordle.png”
  • Log on to WordPress. Pull up your Power Tweets page. Upload your Wordle image by putting the cursor beneath the “Twitter word cloud, 9/1/2015” headline, then click the “add media” button.
  • Save your Power Tweets page. Yay, you’re done! 🙂

Twitter as a (mandatory) journalistic tool

Twitter as a Journalistic Tool For class on Tuesday, Sept. 1: After reading the assigned portions of Briggs Ch. 2, post a 100-to-150-word comment on this post answering this question: How did the chapter change the way you think about how you use (or don’t use) Twitter as a professional journalistic tool? Be honest and specific. This is worth 5 class participation points and is due no later than 11:59 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31.

Digital Journalism Job Summit!

At Tuesday’s Digital Journalism Job Summit, we’ll visit with three recent SMU and Digital Journalism alums who all are thriving as Web-empowered media professionals:

    • Aida Ahmed, formerly a crime and government reporter for the Las Vegas Sun, is a social media specialist for Deloitte in Dallas.
    • Kelsey Charles works for the Dallas Cowboys. She is the managing editor for 5PointsBlue.com and hosts Talkin’ Cowboys, a radio show.
    • Marissa O’Connor, formerly a programming coordinator for new media at E! Online in Los Angeles, is social media manager for the Arizona Coyotes in Phoenix.

Come with questions! BONUS: Marissa wrote a blog post for an earlier Digital class with all kinds of helpful job-hunting tips:

Hi Jake!

I’d like to think I learned a thing or two over my job search process so here goes! I apologize in advance for any typos..

1) ENJOY YOURSELF: Enjoy your last few weeks at SMU, they really are some of the best weeks of your entire college career. Graduation, especially the Meadows graduation is such an amazing time spent with your family AND friends!

2) Don’t think you need a job by May 15. You don’t. You’ve worked really hard the past four years and the right job is out there. I remember thinking I should apply to PR jobs just to have “a job” by May 15 like my older siblings had. That couldn’t be more false! In reality, this could be your last summer without a 9-5 job, so enjoy yourself!

3) …that being said, DON’T CREATE A GAP IN YOUR RESUME. The beauty of journalism is you can build your resume anytime any where. Could an accountant build their resume while laying on the beach all summer? No. Journalists can! I spent my summer after college writing for WhatsUpTucket, a social media hub for the island of Nantucket off of Cape Cod. (www.whatsuptucket.com) I wrote every week, if not every day. I had so much fun interviewing people and writing stories covering what was happening on the island. No matter what you’re doing this summer, blog about it! Tweet about it. Talk about it! Even if it’s “20 things I learned in summer 2012”- use your digital journalism skills and turn it into a piece you can bring in to interviews! When I interviewed at E! for my current job in New Media, they wanted to hear more about my summer writing for WhatUpTucket than my summer spent interning at The View in NYC. I specifically talked about how the site truly branded itself and wrote for a unique audience. This is something all of you have probably already done on your website!

4) NETWORK! It really is the name of the game. While on Nantucket for the summer I met so many different people who knew so many different people who worked in the entertainment field. SO many people you don’t even know yet want to help you find a job! (Myself included!) Tell people upfront that you just graduated from SMU with a degree in journalism, tell them about the daily update, your personal website etc! People will listen and they will help you – so don’t be shy and definitely don’t be embarrassed to say you don’t have a job yet! Trust me, you’re in good company!

5) The Job Search: Be patient, but be persistent! Make a list of job sites that you’re interested in and check them a few times a week. http://www.nbcunicareers.com where I found my job, updates their website EVERY day! I would research jobs every Monday and Wednesday of the week last summer and I typically waited to apply to jobs on a Monday or Tuesday. I’m not sure if there’s any truth behind this, but I didn’t think people would be interested in my emails on a Thursday or Friday when they were thinking about the weekend! Also, create a list of companies you’d like to work for and follow them on twitter! Starting today. If you’re intereted in ESPN, follow @RecruiterStacy – she tweets jobs all the time! So does @DisneyABC, foxcareers, etc. I was given the advice to apply for jobs that had “coordinator or assistant” in the title. Don’t be dismayed at careers that require 2-3 years of experience- majority will! Mine did! You have been immersing yourself in many different news platforms the past four years of college — and your hard work should be credited! Talk about your digital journalism work; your knowledge of vimeo, wordpress, garageband etc! Recruiters LOVE to hear from young people who have a good grasp on the futue of the industry, and all of you do!

6) You found the perfect job – but how do you let them know you’d be perfect for it? Many times when I was applying for jobs online I was convinced my resume and cover letters were getting lost in cyberspace. There really is know way to be sure that a job you submit online gets read by the proper person. Try to find someone in HR at the company- many times even just googling the company and HR you can locate a recruiter. Also, don’t be shy about asking around! If your cousins friend brother works at Good Morning America and that’s your dream – send him a facebook message simply asking if he knows the contact information for HR. You’re not asking for a job, you’re simply asking for an email address and everyone who has a job today was in your position at one point. If you can, drop in to the place you’re applying and submit your resume in person. This sounds so old fashion, but I know many people who landed job this way! It show that your eager and enthusiastic.

7) Interviewing: I truly believe that landing an interview is harder than nailing an interview. Once you have an interview lined up prepare yourself – update your website, tweak your resume, and show up to the interview with writing samples. Be enthusiastic! If nothing else, leave the interview knowing that you were the most enthusiastic person they met that day. Many recruiters are just looking for personalities that are teachable — you can learn any skill set with the right personality and eagerness to learn. Show up prepared with questions – one question I asked was “What is the most common mistake new hires make?” – and people always love that question! People also love to talk about themselves- ask them how they got their start in the industry, where they went to college etc. Highlight your work at SMU and in internships. Be prepared to talk about things you learned along the way. I always say that my summer at The View one of the main things I learned was managing personalities. On and off the screen, ‘The View’ is made up of a cast of characters- there were so many unique personalities and learning how to work with each one of them was the hardest part of the job! It’s “real world” experience like that which shows people that at 21/22 you’re prepared for the industry.

If you need any help brainstorming or talking about ways to highlight your skill set have a mock interview with Jake or Lucy! I am also more than willing to help you. If any of you have any questions, feel free to email me!

Good luck y’all — and congrats on graduating!

Remember: there’s no better time to be a journalist! Really!

All the best,

Marissa

Take-Home Audio Gathering Exercise

***SEE FULL ASSIGNMENT ON BLACKBOARD (under Assignments) – YOUR SOUNDCLOUD LINKS ARE DUE BY NOON MONDAY, 3/23***

The ultimate goal of our two-part audio gathering/editing lab exercise is to produce a short audio clip of 30 to 45 seconds that tells a coherent story. Here’s an example from Digital Journalism alum Laura Rowe, who visited an SMU isotope lab:

And just to show y’all that even old fogies can do this, here are two more example audio labs completed by two of your favorite professors:

Batsell — The Fountain on a Late Winter Day


Suhler — E-mailing: The Scourge of the 21st Century

Two more examples (to be explained further in class):

From these examples, you can see that you will need 1) NAT SOUND; 2) VO and 3) a short INTERVIEW describing the sound (preferably with someone you don’t know).

Save your three (SHORT) raw audio files on your computer or an external drive and post them individually to SoundCloud. Email them to me by noon Monday, March 23. On Tuesday, bring your raw files to class. You’ll use GarageBand to edit your three clips into an NPR-worthy masterpiece!

P.S. Looking for some tips on voiceovers? Here’s a great tutorial from the Knight Digital Media Center.